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Congressman Tom Marino

Representing the 10th District of Pennsylvania

Marino Supports Bicameral Action to Prevent Agency Regulations

December 2, 2015
Press Release

Washington, D.C.—Congressman Tom Marino (R-PA) issued the following statement after supporting the seldom-used Congressional Review Act yesterday on the House floor as a means to reign-in federal agency overreach:

“One of my main goals has been, and will continue to be, to put forth fair and reasonable proposals to check executive bureaucracies that overregulate and stifle our economy. In this instance we used the CRA to overturn some of the EPA’s most invasive new regulations to date. These rules should undoubtedly be challenged in court but Congress also has a responsibility to exercise its authority to override agency overreach. It also serves as another indicator of just how imperative my REVIEW Act is to slowing the economic damages of misguided regulations.”

Background:

  • The House passed, S.J. Res. 24 "Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of a rule submitted by the Environmental Protection Agency relating to "Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources: Electric Utility Generating Units,” by a vote of 424-180.
  • Additionally, S.J. Res. 23 "Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of a rule submitted by the Environmental Protection Agency relating to "Standards of Performance for Greenhouse Gas Emissions from New, Modified, and Reconstructed Stationary Sources: Electric Utility Generating Units,” passed by a vote of 235-188.
  • On November 3, 2015, Congressman Marino held a Judiciary subcommittee hearing on H.R. 3438, the Require Evaluation before Implementing Executive Wishlists Act of 2015 or REVIEW Act. This legislation seeks to automatically stay the effective dates of new regulations which cost the economy one billion dollars or more when prompt legal challenges to these costliest of rules are filed in court.  The stays would remain in place until the legal challenges are finally resolved by the courts (source).

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